It’s about the business model

Marco Arment:

… the reason I choose to minimize Google’s access to me is that my balance of utility versus ethical comfort is different. Both companies do have flaws, but they’re different flaws, and I tolerate them differently:

Apple is always arrogant, controlling, and inflexible, and sometimes stingy. Google is always creepy, entitled, and overreaching, and sometimes oblivious.

How you feel about these companies depends on how much utility you get out of their respective products and how much you care about their flaws.

Simply put, Apple’s benefits are usually worth their flaws to me, and Google’s usually aren’t.

Rene Riche:

Both Apple and Google have been stating their corporate goals with increasing frequency, including during their respective keynotes. Both are worth comparing and contrasting.

Apple’s is to make great products. Google’s is to organize the world’s data.

Expanded, that means Apple needs to enter categories where the company believes it can make a substantial contribution through really great products it can sell to a select segment of the market.

Google needs to convince everyone on earth to hand over all of their data so Google can organize it and make it accessible to everyone else on earth.

Apple funds its strategy by selling those great products at substantial margins. Google by selling advertising against, and intelligence obtained from, the data.

Everything Apple says and does on stage is designed to get you to give them money for a product, and to enjoy it so much you want to keep giving them more money for subsequent products.

Everything Google says and does on stage is to get you to give them more data, and to enjoy it so much you want to keep giving them more data.

Agreed.