Bullish on the Watch

There has been a lot of noise about the Apple Watch recently. I’m planning on getting one, and am quite bullish on their future. Here are a couple of great posts I’ve seen on it this week…

From Ben Thompson, why the future is wearables that people actually want to wear:

It’s increasingly plausible to envision a future where all of these examples and a whole host of others in our physical environment are fundamentally transformed by software: locks that only unlock for me, payment systems that keep my money under my control, and in general an adaptation to my presence whether that be at home, at the concert hall, or at work. To fully interact with this sort of software-enabled environment, I will of course need some way to identify myself; for all the benefits of the human body, projecting a unique digital signature is not one of them.

From Greg Koenig, a class in metallurgy, based on the production line videos Apple released:

Work hardening is one of those counterintuitive industrial processes where we take an undesirable aspect of a material and Judo it into a significant improvement. As the gold is cast into ingots, the crystalline lattice structure of the alloy is nearly perfectly aligned. What Apple is about to do is introduce — in a highly controlled and precise manner — defects in that lattice (known in the art as “dislocations”). The effect is to harden the material by giving future impact events or stresses a limited number of spots on the lattice to start (technical term: nucleate), and if they do start, very little room to propagate. You can experiment with this yourself using a metal paperclip- start bending the paperclip back and forth and you’ll notice it gets ever so slightly more difficult to bend as you repeat the process. Eventually, you will create so many dislocations in the metal that the part will fracture into two pieces, but for a short period, you will have work hardened that section to a point where some potentially desirable material changes would have taken place. Add a tremendous amount of precision, equipment capable of applying thousands of tonnes of force and replace the paperclip with a US$50k ingot of gold alloy and you’re working at Apple.

Also, I’ve revised my sizing thoughts for my future purchase. Based on the built in sizing guide in the Apple Store app, I’ll probably end up purchasing the 42mm watch.